Clapham Osteopathy and Functional Movement

Scottish Doctors Are Now Issuing Prescriptions to Go Hiking

person hikingBeing active out in nature can have positive benefits for both physical and mental health. And now some doctors in the Shetlands have begun issuing “nature prescriptions” as part of an initiative to address health issues without drugs. We love hiking, so this is one prescription we’d eagerly look forward to having filled and refilled!

 

Read the full article, Scottish Doctors Are Now Issuing Prescriptions to Go Hiking.

The Top 5 Health Benefits of Coffee

coffee beansCoffee. Love it or hate it, you probably can’t escape it. (We love it, BTW) There have been many stories in the news over the past few years discussing its potential health benefits, and in this article, Chris Kresser details 5 big ones. For balance, he also includes a section on people that probably shouldn’t be drinking the stuff.

So kick back with a cup o’ joe and read the full article, The Top 5 Health Benefits of Coffee.

Joint Noises, Popping & Clicking: Should You Worry?

man cracking knucklesThis article, from the talented folks at GMB, offers a good explanation of joint pops and clicks. As they say, you don’t need to get too concerned if there isn’t any pain. However, pops or clicks may indicate poor motor control in the joint which can lead to problems down the line. At Backs Etc, we utilise NKT, breathing and exercise to get your joints working the way they are supposed to.

Read the full article, Joint Noises, Popping & Clicking: Should You Worry?

To Stretch or Not to Stretch

Woman stretching

Must. Stretch. More. This seems to be a mantra for so many of us, and it’s no surprise why. From a young age, we’ve had the message drilled into us that we must always stretch before and after exercise, when we wake up, when something feels tight, etc. Stretch, stretch, stretch. Of course, there absolutely is a time and place for stretching, but it shouldn’t necessarily be done willy nilly. Many of our patients and clients have developed habits of endlessly stretching and rolling tight muscles as a form of self-therapy and treatment, a habit that is encouraged by many trainers and other professionals. We would like to highlight two reasons why this may not be helpful.

  1. The tightness and tension we feel is just a sign that a muscle is dysfunctional.  It’s a Goldilocks problem in that it can be held overly shortened, or overstretched.  Both states will feel tight, but the overstretched ones will not respond well to more stretching. For example, many people complain about tight hamstrings, yet are able to touch their hands to the floor in a forward bend. Here the hamstrings are overstretched and the tightness is a message from your nervous system asking you to stop stretching out and possibly tearing the muscle.  In this case, an activation exercise to shorten the muscle is going to be a much more effective strategy.

  2. If a muscle is short and tight, it is due to the body creating tension to help maintain postural stability.  The first priority of your nervous system is to keep you safe and stable, and it sometimes shortens muscles to do this, creating a scaffolding of support. This is especially true when you are not breathing well and unable to generate good core stability. This can lead to tight hip, mid back, neck and/ or jaw muscles.  Attempting to loosen these patterns without getting to the root of the problem is futile, as you are trying to defeat your nervous system’s prime role in movement control.

In both cases, we often hear patients describing that foam rolling or massage feels good for a few hours or even a day, but then the symptoms return because the underlying cause has not been addressed. So your brain recreates the stability strategy it has got used to even if it is not optimal.

At Backs Etc we use NeuroKinetic Therapy to assess the strategy your brain is using to keep you safe and stable, and then design a treatment plan incorporating both stretches and activations that work with your nervous system.  This leads to normalisation of the tensions and tightness in the muscles so that you don’t feel the need to constantly stretch, roll or massage them.

 

The Dangers of Acetaminophen

bottle of pillsAcetaminophen, most commonly known as Tylenol, is one of the most popular over-the-counter painkillers. Most people don’t think twice about taking it for the occasional ache or pain. Yet acetaminophen may be one of the most dangerous medicines in the drugstore. In this article, functional medicine practitioner Chris Kresser discusses the potential liver toxicity of the drug, as well as its negative effects on cardiovascular health, kidney disease, and even cancer.

Read the full article, The Dangers of Acetaminophen.

The Great Con-ola

bottle of oilThis article from The Weston A. Price Foundation takes aim at one of our most popular cooking oils, canola. The food industry has been lauding the benefits of canola oil since its arrival on the scene in the mid-1980s, calling it ‘heart healthy’, ‘high in Omega 3s’ and ‘widely recognized as the healthiest salad and cooking oil available to consumers.’ However, there is a dark side to canola oil, as studies have shown it to actually be potentially dangerous to humans. This article details the history of the oil and documents the health risks associated with canola and other industrial seed oils.

Read the full article, The Great Con-ola.

If You Want To Save The World, Veganism Isn’t The Answer

dry field with one treeVeganism is becoming more and more popular these days. Understandably so, as people are becoming increasingly concerned about the impact of Intensively farmed meat and dairy’s toll on the environment. However, in this article, farmer Isabella Tree discusses the potential negative implications that veganism can have on the sustainability of our farmland, as well as our health. This article is a great read no matter which side of the debate you may stand on.

Read the full article, If You Want To Save The World, Veganism Isn’t The Answer

Neurokinetic Therapy: Revolutionary Rehab for Injuries & Chronic Pain

neck examNeurokinetic Therapy. If you’ve been to see us at Backs Etc., you’ve probably heard this phrase. NKT, as it’s known for short, is an innovative technique which utilises manual muscle testing to assess dysfunctions in the coordination system of the brain that can result from injury, postural stress or poor movement patterns. It cues the brain for new learning resulting in immediate correction of neuromuscular imbalances. NKT addresses pain at its source: the motor control centre of the brain.

In this article, renowned functional medicine practitioner Dr. Josh Axe discusses the technique, its history,  and how it’s personally helped him recover from a lower back injury.

Read the full article, Neurokinetic Therapy: Revolutionary Rehab for Injuries & Chronic Pain